Why are our Most Important Teachers Paid the Least?

Teach Cursive Writing! Why It’s Important for Children Including Those with Dyslexia

Cursive writing is important for many reasons, and its loss in America’s classrooms should raise concerns. Cursive not only differs from print in the way it looks, it connects letters to words in a meaningful and productive way. It has been shown to assist children with reading difficulties like dyslexia.

All students benefit by learning how to write in cursive. Scientific American reported on a study which found that students who write notes in cursive during lectures remember much more than if they use their laptop.  If students never learn longhand (cursive) it might impede their learning. Print is cumbersome and takes too long when taking notes.

Source: Teach Cursive Writing! Why It’s Important for Children Including Those with Dyslexia

MLK

3%

When You Mistreat Teachers, Beware the Unintended Lessons for Students | gadflyonthewallblog

We’ve all seen the shocking video from Vermillion Parish in Louisiana this week where a teacher is tackled to the ground and arrested because she asked a question to the school board.

Source: When You Mistreat Teachers, Beware the Unintended Lessons for Students | gadflyonthewallblog

MEA Advocating for Fast, Accurate Return of 3 Percent | MEAMatters

From MEA.org:

Right before the holiday break, the Office of Retirement Services (ORS) put out information regarding how refunds would be handled through local school districts for employees owed their 3 percent after our unanimous legal victory before the Michigan Supreme Court.

After more than seven years of waiting for a resolution to this case, some speed is finally appreciated. But MEA is also working to make sure these refunds are handled correctly so that every school employee who is owed money receives it. That’s why MEA and the other plaintiffs in the case have asked the trial court to require ORS develop guidelines consistent with court decisions for how this money should be returned.  This will keep school districts from handling questions inconsistently – and ensure those districts aren’t left to clean up the state’s mess after years of frivolous appeals in this case.

For many employees, the refund is simple – they worked during 2010-2012 in the same place they’re working today. But what about those who’ve retired? Or left the profession? Or died waiting for their money to be returned? Both school employees and school districts deserve clear answers about how to properly handle the return of this money to those who earned it – and MEA is working to ensure that happens.

Pending the court’s response to our request for ORS to work with us to develop those guidelines, there are two things you can be doing now to prepare for the refund:

1 Gather together any records you have that show exactly how much money was taken from 2010-2012 – particularly copies of your paycheck details that itemize funds taken from your check.

2 If you no longer work in the district where you were employed in 2010-2012, get in touch with them and ensure they have your up-to-date contact information. (And be sure to share that information with us at webmaster@mea.org as well so we can keep you informed of any developments.)

Source: MEA Advocating for Fast, Accurate Return of 3 Percent | MEAMatters