Nine education predictions for 2018 — some of them heartbreaking – The Washington Post

Ever year, veteran teacher Larry Ferlazzo makes a list of education predictions — and here’s his list for 2018. (You can see his predictions from earlier years at the bottom of this post.)

Ferlazzo teaches English and social studies at Luther Burbank High School in Sacramento. He has written eight books on education, writes a teacher advice blog for Education Week Teacher and has a popular resource-sharing blog.

Source: Nine education predictions for 2018 — some of them heartbreaking – The Washington Post

Blunt Educator

101 Wishes For Students in 2018—In 5 Words or Less

  1. Provide children plenty of recess.
  2. Pay attention to child development.
  3. Cherish play for children.
  4. Encourage teens to socialize.
  5. Lower class sizes.
  6. Bring back the arts.

Source: 101 Wishes For Students in 2018—In 5 Words or Less

National Grange Calls on Congress to Reduce High-Stakes Standardized Testing | Diane Ravitch’s blog

The National Grange, which represents rural communities across America, released this resolution. The Grange moves deliberately and thoughtfully before it takes a position. Its resolutions are initiated locally, then reviewed at the state and national levels before adoption.

The resolution says:


WHEREAS, our nation’s future well-being relies on a high-quality public education system that prepares all students for college, careers, citizenship and lifelong learning, and strengthens the nation’s social and economic well-being; and

WHEREAS, our nation’s school systems have been spending growing amounts of time, money and energy on high-stakes standardized testing, in which student performance on standardized tests is used to make major decisions affecting individual students, educators and schools; and

Source: National Grange Calls on Congress to Reduce High-Stakes Standardized Testing | Diane Ravitch’s blog

New Year’s Resolution

My Karma Ran Over My Dogma (A Confessional) | Blue Cereal Education

I always swore I’d never be one of those teachers. You know the type – frustrated and hostile, blaming their kids, and longing for the “good ol’ days.” To be honest, I’ve often kinda looked down on that flavor of educator – wondering why they’re still in the classroom, and hoping they find somewhere else to work out their issues. Besides, they give the rest of us – with our superior ideals and natural love of children – a bad name. It’s shameful!

But I hereby confess to you, my eleven faithful followers, that I am paying for that vanity. Dearly. Pride had a few laughs, and now… well, it’s been a long fall.

I rarely said it out loud, of course. I reject teacher-shaming in general, whatever its source. But I thought it. I felt a tiny bit superior. I may have rolled my eyes on occasion. I know I sighed a few times.

And I’m sorry.

It’s not like I’m blindly idealistic.

Source: My Karma Ran Over My Dogma (A Confessional) | Blue Cereal Education